About

I'm a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University's Science of Learning Institute with affiliations in the Department of Cognitive Science and the Center for Language and Speech Processing. I work on the JHU Decompositional Semantics Initiative (Decomp), led by Kyle Rawlins and Benjamin Van Durme.

I'm interested in the relationship between word meaning and syntactic/semantic structure, focusing specifically on how this relationship can be leveraged to learn the meanings of verbs. I use a variety of methodologies in my work, including computational modeling, behavioral experiments, corpus methods, and traditional distributional analysis.

Before starting at Johns Hopkins, I received my BA in Linguistics from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2009, followed by a year in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Maryland as a Baggett Fellow. I went on to receive my PhD in Linguistics from the University of Maryland in 2015. My dissertation, Information and Incrementality in Syntactic Bootstrapping, was co-advised by Valentine Hacquard and Jeff Lidz.

Contact

E-mail aswhite@jhu.edu

Office 153 Krieger Hall, Homewood campus, Johns Hopkins University.

Upcoming presentations

White, A. S., D. Reisinger, K. Sakaguchi, K. Rawlins, & B. Van Durme. (2016). Universal decompositional semantics on universal dependencies. To be presented at Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing 2016, Austin, TX.

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2017). Entropy predicts uncertainty in subcategorization frame distributions. To be presented at the 39th Annual Conference of the German Linguistic Society, AG1: Information-theory based modeling of linguistic variation in context, Saarland University.

White, A. S.. (2017). Unsupervised methods for linguistic data. Course to be given at the 29th European Summer School in Logic, Language, and Information, University of Toulouse.

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2017). Computational lexical semantics. Course to be given at the 29th European Summer School in Logic, Language, and Information, University of Toulouse.

Recent presentations

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2016). Question agnosticism and change of state. Presented at Sinn und Bedeutung 21, University of Edinburgh.

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2016). A computational model of S-selection. Presented at Semantics and Linguistic Theory 26, University of Texas, Austin.

Fetters, M. & A. S. White (2016). Pseudogapping does not involve heavy shift. Presented at the 34th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, University of Utah.

White, A. S. & J. Sprouse. (2016). The trace of categorical structure in gradient judgments. Presented at the 34th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, University of Utah.

White, A. S., V. Hacquard, P. Resnik, & J. Lidz. (2016). Subcategorization frame entropy in online verb-learning. Presented at the 29th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, University of Florida.

Papers

White, A. S., V. Hacquard, & J. Lidz. (2016). Semantic information and the syntax of propositional attitude verbs. revised and resubmitted to Cognitive Science. [Former title: Projecting attitudes.]

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2016). A computational model of S-selection. to appear in Semantics and Linguistic Theory 26.

White, A. S., D. Reisinger, R. Rudinger, K. Rawlins, & B. Van Durme. (2016). Computational linking theory. revised and resubmitted to Transactions of the ACL.

White, A. S., D. Reisinger, K. Sakaguchi, K. Rawlins, & B. Van Durme. (2016). Universal decompositional semantics on universal dependencies. to appear in Proceedings of the Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing.

White, A. S., V. Hacquard, & J. Lidz. (2016). Main clause syntax and the labeling problem in syntactic bootstrapping. under review for Semantics in Acquisition, eds. K. Syrett and S. Arunachalam. Trends in Language Acquisition Research (TiLAR). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Fetters, M. & A. S. White (2016). Pseudogapping does not involve heavy shift. To appear in Proceedings of the 34th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics.

White, A. S. (2015). Information and Incrementality in Syntactic Bootstrapping. Doctoral Dissertation. University of Maryland, College Park.

D. Altshuler, V. Hacquard, T. Roberts, & A. S. White. (2015). On double access, cessation and parentheticality. In Proceedings of SALT 25, eds. S. D'Antonio, C. Little, M. Moroney, and M. Wiegand, 18-37. Ithaca, NY: CLC Publications.

Lidz, J., A. S. White, & R. Baier. (2014). The role of incremental parsing in syntactically conditioned word learning. under revision.

White, A. S. (2014). Factive-implicatives and modalized complements. In Proceedings of the 44th Meeting of the North East Linguistic Society, eds. J. Iyer, L. Kusmer, 267-278. Amherst, MA: GLSA Publications.

White, A. S. & Grano, T. (2014). An experimental investigation of partial control. In Proceedings of Sinn und Bedeutung 18, eds. U. Etxeberria, A. Fălăuș, A. Irurtzun, B. Leferman, 469-486. Semantics Archive.

White, A. S., Dudley, R., V. Hacquard & J. Lidz (2014). Discovering classes of attitude verbs using subcategorization frame distributions. In Proceedings of the 43rd Meeting of the North East Linguistic Society, eds. H-L. Huang, E. Poole, A. Rysling, 249-260. Amherst, MA: GLSA Publications.

Conference presentations and invited talks

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2016). Question agnosticism and change of state. Presented at Sinn und Bedeutung 21, University of Edinburgh.

White, A. S. & K. Rawlins. (2016). A computational model of S-selection. Presented at Semantics and Linguistic Theory 26, University of Texas, Austin.

Fetters, M. & A. S. White (2016). Pseudogapping does not involve heavy shift. Presented at the 34th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, University of Utah.

White, A. S. & J. Sprouse. (2016). The trace of categorical structure in gradient judgments. Presented at the 34th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, University of Utah.

White, A. S., V. Hacquard, P. Resnik, & J. Lidz. (2016). Subcategorization frame entropy in online verb-learning. Presented at the 29th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, University of Florida.

White, A. S. (2015). Learner as lexical semanticist. Distinguished Alumnus Address, Linguistics Undergraduate Research Conference, University of California, Santa Cruz.

Altshuler, D., V. Hacquard, T. Roberts, & A. S. White (2015). On double access, cessation and parentheticality. Presented at Semantics and Linguistic Theory 25, Stanford University.

White, A. S. (2015). Soft implicative entailments. Presented at the 89th Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America, Portland, OR.

White, A. S. (2014). Contextually modulated syntactic variability in child-directed speech. Presented at the 13th International Congress for the Study of Child Language, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

White, A. S., V. Hacquard, J. Lidz (2014). Syntactic sources of semantics and pragmatics. Presented at the 13th International Congress for the Study of Child Language, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

White, A. S. (2013). Factive-implicatives and modalized complements. Presented at the 44th annual meeting of the North East Linguistic Society, University of Connecticut.

White, A. S., & Grano, T. (2013). An experimental investigation of partial control. Presented at Sinn und Bedeutung 18, University of the Basque Country.

J. Lidz, & White, A. S. (2013). Predictive parsing and the acquisition of thematic structure. Presented at the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Seattle, WA.

White, A. S., Dudley, R., V. Hacquard, & J. Lidz (2012). Discovering classes of attitude verbs using subcategorization frame distributions. Presented at the 43rd annual meeting of the North East Linguistic Society, CUNY.

White, A. S., R. Baier, & J. Lidz. (2011). Prediction and subcategorization frame frequency in the developing parser. Presented at the 24th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Stanford University.

White, A. S., R. Baier, & J. Lidz. (2010). When knowledge causes failure: Effects of subcategorization frequency in novel word learning. Presented at the 35th Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston University.